Woolly Pockets. Plants thrive at BBC Gardeners’ World living walls.

Living wall at the bbc NEC birmingham

 

The Only Way Is Up!

Visitors to this year’s BBC Gardeners World at the NEC cannot fail to be impressed by the wall of wonder that is on display outside the floral marquee. By using Woolly Pockets, supplied by Garden Beet, the Gardeners World Living Wall demonstrates just how fun and versatile vertical gardening can be.

 

Bugs, Sun, Shade and Visitor Participation!

New to the show this year, this amazing interactive feature, showcases three vertical gardening ideas, for different plant types;

Shade loving plants, including hostas, ferns and fuchsias adorn one side, whilst sun lovers like trailing geranium and nasturtium display their beauty on the other. The third living wall highlights bee, bug and butterfly friendly plants that attract pollinators to the garden.

 

Interactive Fun For Good Causes

Half of each wall has been left available for visitors to bring along their own plants and help plant it up, so they can experience for themselves just how easy and fun it is to create a living wall. After the show the Woolly Pockets and the plants will be donated to three local schools;-

St Thomas More Catholic Primary School; Fox Hollies School; and Performing Arts College and President Kennedy School.

 

Presenters get the public to “Grow up!”

BBC Gardeners World presenters, Joe Swift, Rachel de Thame, Carol Klein and Monty Don will be on hand by the living wall this weekend to offer advice and get the public learning all about “growing up!” There is a special feature on vertical gardening that will be show on BBC Gardeners World on Friday 15th June.

 

 

 

 

Be Sociable, Share!

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

  • Pingback: Woolly Pocket Thrives at BBC Gardeners’ World | Woolly Pocket

  • http://mercadee.com/ mercadeo en linea

    “Sarah Barnard, an interior designer in Santa Monica, Calif., suggested a living wall system made by Woolly Pocket Corp. to a client with an awkward hallway lined by French doors and filled with sunlight. “Instead of taking the strategy of family photos down the hallway, or some other common trope, we decided to try the Woolly Pockets,” she says.